Our tough little Taylor was born with an unexpected heart defect. At less than 24 hours old, our baby was airlifted via helicopter to a hospital that could perform a lifesaving procedure. We were able to bring her home two weeks later under the assumption that she would need to have open-heart surgery within a couple months. Taylor is now five years old and miraculously has not needed an operation yet. We call her our little miracle. She brings us so much joy and every day is such a blessing! We pray for continued advancement in congenital heart defect research, so our little princess can have a fairy tale ending.

16 weeks into pregnancy, Sean’s parents were told there was a problem with the structure of his heart.  A few weeks later, Sean was diagnosed with Transposition of the great arteries (TGA) with a ventricular septal defect (VSD- a hole between the ventricles of the heart.) When Sean was five days old, he underwent open heart surgery.  He did great!  There are a couple of areas of his heart that his cardiologist will be watching closely, but they are hopeful that he won’t need any more surgeries.  Today Sean is a happy, and very active boy.  He loves to fish, ride bikes, and play soccer and hockey.

20 weeks into the pregnancy it was discovered that Tyler would be born with an underdeveloped right ventricle and diagnosed with hypoplastic right ventricle with pulmonary atresia. The palliative procedure to improve Tyler’s long-term health is called the Fontan procedure and consists of three separate open-heart surgeries. Within nine days of Tyler’s birth, he underwent his first surgery. His second successful open-heart surgery took place when he was six months old and his third occurred when he was three years old.

Tyler is a happy, expressive and outgoing little boy who loves school and playing with his twin brother Charlie. He owes his good health to a superb medical team that is advancing relatively new techniques in the treatment of congenital heart defects. Thanks to research funded by The Children’s Heart Foundation, Tyler and thousands of others with similar conditions are able to enjoy healthy and happy lives.

Noah was diagnosed with Tricuspid Atresia and a Hypoplastic Right Ventricle at our 20 week ultrasound. In his first 4 years, Noah endured three open-heart surgeries, in order to circumvent the right side of his heart, and a couple of other surgeries to treat a severe bacterial infection.

Because of ongoing research funded by organizations such as The Children’s Heart Foundation, Noah is no different from the typical 7-year-old boy. In fact, unless you saw the scar on his chest, you wouldn’t even know that he has a heart defect. He just completed 1st grade, loves playing sports, and is an amazing big brother!

Jane was born with an unexpected heart defect and had corrective surgery when she was eight days old. After numerous complications and a three month hospital stay, Jane is now a feisty little girl with red hair that matches her personality. She is determined to keep up with her brothers and sister and has the bumps and bruises to prove it. Jane is a miracle and without the past research done on congenital heart defects, her story may not have been such a happy one to share.
Ben was diagnosed with Transposition of the Great Arteries when he was only 11 hours old. Transposition of the Great Arteries is a congenital heart defect in which his aorta and pulmonary artery were reversed. At five days old he underwent corrective open-heart surgery. The surgical techniques used to save Benjamin were not around 30 years ago. It is because of the research funded by The Children‘s Heart Foundation that Benjamin is such a healthy, happy boy today. Benjamin‘s family is so grateful for their miracle.
Drew is has a CHD called Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS). Basically, that means he was born with half a heart. He has had three open heart surgeries and six cardiac catheterizations. Without surgical intervention, Drew’s heart defect is fatal within days of birth. Drew’s aunt was also born with HLHS. But, 35 years ago, there were no treatment options and she passed away when she was only 3 days old. Thanks to life-saving research and the support of people like you, Drew and many other kids with HLHS are with us today.
Sydney

Sydney